ELGIN, Ill. — A man was ordered held without bond Tuesday to face murder and other charges after dismembered remains believed to be his mother were found in luggage submerged in a lagoon at Chicago’s Lincoln Park.

Brian Peck, 55, of the Chicago suburb of Elgin, faces two counts of first-degree murder and one count of concealment of a homicide in the death of Gail Peck, 76, Elgin police said.

During a hearing Tuesday in Cook County court in Rolling Meadows, prosecutors alleged Brian Peck attempted to conceal the body in recently purchased luggage.

Citing details from prosecutors that indicated “extensive planning and premeditation,” Cook County Circuit Judge Steven J. Goebel said Peck posed an “extreme real and present threat” when he ordered him held without bond.

Police said Peck called authorities Friday afternoon and said his mother went for a walk with her dog and the dog returned home without her. That prompted an hours-long search that included officers on foot, a drone, helicopter and all-terrain vehicles.

On Saturday, two duffel bags containing human remains were discovered in the lagoon after a fisherman found one of the bags. Chicago police said a dive team found the second bag.

Elgin police said Tuesday that investigators have evidence the body is Gail Peck. They also are doing DNA testing, which isn’t complete, but police have enough evidence to charge Brian Peck, deputy chief Bill Wolf said.

The (Arlington Heights) Daily Herald reports that DuPage County records show Gail Peck filed an order of protection against her son in March 2016. She told police they argued about loud music he was playing and he twice put her in a chokehold and said he was going to kill her.

Court records show Brian Peck pleaded guilty in June 2016 to domestic battery causing bodily harm and received a 100-day jail sentence.

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