SALT LAKE CITY — The burgeoning community of Utah food trucks is collaborating to fight what owners are calling burdensome and costly city and county regulations.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports ( that officials say the rules are necessary due to the unique health issues of the trucks and to be fair to traditional restaurants.

A Rally for Food Truck Freedom was sponsored by the Libertas Institute and the Food Truck League to make people more aware of the numerous regulations.

The institute and Spanish Fork Republican Sen. Deidre Henderson are working on legislation for the 2017 Legislature to streamline the rules.

Waffle Love trucks owner Adam Terry says following the rules costs his business $5,000 annually and that he had to hire a separate employee to handle the task.

Jeffrey Oaks, the Salt Lake County Health Department food protection manager, says a universal permit could become a problem when violators need to be shut down.

“We could stop someone from operating in our county, but since we didn’t issue the permit, we wouldn’t have any mechanism to stop them from coming back the next day and doing the same thing,” he said. “The permit is the mechanism we use to lean on them and correct the issues.”

Ken Bullock, executive director of the Utah League of Cities and Towns, said permits bring communities money.

“Community leaders want a vibrant community and want residents to enjoy a variety of different types of food and cultures,” he said. “But they also need to give consideration to restaurants who have invested a significant amount in brick and mortar.”

Information from: The Salt Lake Tribune,

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